Her Canna Q&A: Windy Borman, “Mary Janes: The Women of Weed”

Windy said:
“My personal mission is to create film and digital media that give a voice to the voiceless and promote peace, justice and equality.”

Describe yourself and what you do.

I am a filmmaker. I produce, write and direct films, videos, and digital media. Depending on the day, that encompasses everything from interviewing subjects, pitching investors, writing budgets and production schedules, developing creative assets, holding a camera, directing an edit, writing blog posts or Op-Eds, recording voice-overs, etc. While I wear a lot of hats, my personal mission is to create film and digital media that give a voice to the voiceless and promote peace, justice and equality.

What is your vision for your professional cannabis endeavors?”

I’ve always been intrigued by social issues, especially gender equality, social justice, environmental protection, education and empowerment. When I moved to Colorado in 2014—the same year recreational use of marijuana became legal—and started meeting successful women in the cannabis industry, I knew I was perfectly positioned to tell these female entrepreneurs’ stories and inspire domestic and global audiences about how gender parity, social justice and environmental sustainability lead to greater success for all. This became the feature-length documentary, “Mary Janes: The Women of Weed”, which premiered at film festivals in October 2017.

I purchased my own legal cannabis at a Colorado dispensary and recruited a group of “Cannabis Fairy Godmothers” to guide me during my first consumption.

What is your personal cannabis origin story?

I am the daughter of a doctor and nurse, and a product of the D.A.R.E. generation, who learned all drugs are bad, but particularly marijuana because it was a “gateway” drug. I had ample opportunity to try cannabis over the years, but never did until this year. However, I’ve always been intrigued by social issues, especially gender equality, social justice, environmental protection, education and empowerment. I bring that lens to cannabis.

As I said, I never tried marijuana before this film. I didn’t hang out with the people who had cannabis, and I admit I was originally judgmental about cannabis because I was turned off by the “stoner dude” images I saw.

Next, there is alcohol and drug addiction in my family, so hearing marijuana was a “gateway drug” growing up, I didn’t want to chance it. Now we know that alcohol and tobacco are the real gateways to harder drugs, but by the time I realized that, I was too busy making films to risk having a bad reaction to cannabis—or any drug for that matter—so I avoided them.

Given all I’ve learned filming “Mary Janes: The Women of Weed”, I finally decided to try cannabis for the first time. In the ultimate life twist, my first “sesh” was on camera and we included it in “Mary Janes” for the entire world to see.

I heard from many women that their first cannabis experience came at the urging of a man, or at least a male purchased the weed for everyone. I flipped that script and made very mindful and empowered choices. I purchased my own legal cannabis at a Colorado dispensary and recruited a group of “Cannabis Fairy Godmothers” to guide me during my first consumption. As for what happened next, you’ll just have to watch the film.

What is your Superpower?

Creating and sharing stories that open people’s minds, teaching them something about themselves or the world, and inspiring them to take action.

What has been your greatest obstacle in this industry or with your business to date?

I have a timeline, and the Universe has a timeline. The Universe always wins.

When things aren’t lining up, I pause and ask, “Why is this so difficult right now?” It’s usually a timing issue.

When I accept the Universe’s timeline, things begin to flow, and I don’t feel like I’m pushing something upstream. Each of my films reminds me of this lesson.

What is your advice for women in the cannabis industry?

You can’t talk about cannabis without including gender equality, social justice and environmental sustainability.

We’re at a critical point with women demanding more parity in all aspects of society, the Black Lives Matter movement, record-setting global temperatures for the second year in a row, and over half the states have legalized some form of marijuana.

These are the conversations we need to have as a country—and as a world—if we’re going to solve the major issues facing humans as a species. “Mary Janes: The Women of Weed” synthesizes them.

Connect with Windy

Website: http://MaryJanesFilm.com

Facebook: http://Facebook.com/MaryJanesFilm

Instagram: http://instagram.com/MaryJanesFilm

Twitter: http://twitter.com/MaryJanesFilm

Official Trailer: YouTube

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